Education Architecture & Fabrication

University of Maryland Solid Surface Bathroom ProjectIn construction, successful completion of a job is accomplished through effective project management. Delivering a quality project to your client on time and within budget while also turning a profit is no easy feat. It requires careful planning and detailed monitoring of project progress. Communication and collaboration with the General Contractor and other team members is of paramount importance.

Detailed strategic planning is the most important aspect of successful construction project management. The more complex the project, the more planning will be required. A well-planned project maximizes efficiency and provides a step by step roadmap for completing the work on schedule and within budget. For example, college student housing projects can have very tight schedules. Students are scheduled to arrive back from summer break at a specific time. Delays and setbacks many times are not addressed quickly enough to hold the schedule by many solid surface subcontractors.

ASST has a wealth of project management experience in dealing with tight schedules for college student housing projects. For a recent project with Elizabethtown College, there were multiple delays on site that were slowing the job progress. In response, ASST’s Project Manager quickly mobilized the installation team to work longer days and weekends to meet the deadline. Doing what ever it takes and Going Beyond for our customers is of prime importance. Our innovative team of estimators, planners and project managers collaborate and deliver project results in a way few competitors can. Contact us today to see how we can make a difference on your next project!

ASST is uniquely positioned to fulfill all aspects of your project. Whatever you need, ASST can build it to the exact specifications, in a safe manner and to the finest quality standards you expect. Even our EMR safety rating is outstanding at .793! We look forward to Going Beyond to address your exciting project challenges. Contact us now online or call us at 717-630-1251.


Just anyone can build casework right? Well, in a word no. At least not for healthcare and educational project applications. The quality has to be excellent and the service extraordinary. Rigorous requirements for LEED ® certification and FSC materials are further limiting the options available in the marketplace. General Contractors are also under pressure to bring to the table excellent casework subcontractors that prequalify well and limit risk to themselves and the Owner.

There are numerous ways of constructing casework but few can withstand the rigors of a healthcare or educational environment. Typical problems can include the use on non-moisture resistant MDF or particle board. Some fabricators do not follow AWI quality casework standards in their construction means and methods. They instead substitute with low cost materials and finishes that do not meet the Architect’s specification.

To address this issue, ASST has found value in providing a more proactive comprehensive solution. A “onestop” solid surface/ casework/millwork custom solution incorporating a wide variety of finish materials. ASST has now partnered with TMI Systems Corporation as a dealer for their line of casework. Based in North Dakota, TMI is a leader in quality casework fabrication. They are an excellent reputable resource and ASST looks forward to working with them on many future projects. With this new alliance, ASST can perform work with wood veneers, plastic laminate, Trespa®, stone, metal, glass as well as all brands of solid surface and resin plastic materials. Our innovative team of estimators, planners and project managers collaborate and deliver project results in a way few competitors can. We look forward to working with you on your next project!

ASST is uniquely positioned to fulfill all aspects of your project. Whatever you need, ASST can build it to the exact specifications, in a safe manner and to the finest quality standards you expect. Even our EMR safety rating is outstanding at .793! We look forward to Going Beyond to address your exciting project challenges. Contact us now online or call us at 717-630-1251.


Solid surface fabrication in Harvard's Old Quincy House restroomBathroom facilities in historic dormitory buildings are typically in need of renovation because of code violations and outdated fixtures. Harvard’s Old Quincy (pictured here) was recently renewed to match today’s standards and needs by the Philadelphia Architectural firm Kieran Timberlake. Renovating to preserve the historic character of a building while providing a higher performance design with more function and storage continues to be popular with Design Professionals on college campuses.

With bathrooms, a moist environment is tricky for creating a functional design. Anything wood will swell and eventually deteriorate. Early dormitory buildings like Old Quincy historically utilized polished marble for bathroom areas which would easily stain and eventually crack and spall. Any type of storage in bathroom areas was also not a priority back in 1930 when Old Quincy was first built.

A solution to this problem is not only utilizing solid surface for the vanity tops and shower areas but also for built-in storage as well. Kieran Timberlake designed the renovations to Quincy Hall and ASST was selected to fabricate the custom white solid surface storage bins in the bathrooms. Used for student toiletry items, holes drilled through the door faces are used as a finger pull. Students will likely find the new bathroom storage and overall improved “Old Quincy” a welcome place to call home on the Crimson campus.

ASST is uniquely positioned to fulfill all aspects of your project. Whatever you need, ASST can build it to the exact specifications you require in a safe manner and to the finest quality standards you expect. We look forward to Going Beyond™ to address your exciting project challenges. Contact us now online or call us at 717-630-1251.


Spaces for higher education require smart design. The sheer mass number of people from all walks of life makes it necessary to use practical durable solutions and materials to promote community. Architects designing colleges and universities are required by the Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA) to plan structures that are accessible for everyone, but sometimes, Gizmodo reports, the deaf are left out of the equation.

For example, Gallaudet University has recently built a new structure that puts the unique needs of deaf students first. Building program guidelines stipulated that deaf students should be able to communicate more easily. Because communicating with others relies on hand motions, stopping to open or close a door can often interrupt the flow of a conversation. Design solutions for this include doors with motion sensors that slide open. Wider walkways also allow students to talk with peers or professors side-by-side with ease. Too often hallways in are too narrow and hinder those using sign language to communicate because each party is unable make visual contact with each other's hands.

"Deaf culture centers around the language," said Bauman a few years ago, according to the news source. "The language has all the elements of architecture-the spatial kinesthetic of sign language, the desire of deaf people for the visual access that open space affords-lends itself to express the deaf way of being."

To promote community in common area public spaces, design professionals can create interior environments that all students, regardless of how they communicate, can use. Boston's Shepley Bulfinch utilized SCULPTCOR® for their award-winning Brody Learning Commons for Johns Hopkins. Taking inspiration from diverse elements and forms in nature, SCULPTCOR® by ASST is a patented thermoformed architectural wall panel system that is fabricated from non-porous, durable, stain-resistant, and easy to clean solid surface. Appropriate for a variety of uses, the wall panel sizes are 24×64 nominally and are presently available in three standard patterns: Twist, wave and smooth. Panel reveals can be specified either straight or curved in five (5) standard colors: Pure white, cream, warm white, frozen white and white lotus. Additional colors and special panel sizes are available. The largest uncut pressed panel size available is 29.5 x 72.

SCULPTCOR by ASST can be utilized in a variety of project applications such as wall panels, column covers, retail facades, elevator cladding, casework, ceiling panels and furniture. Complete Autodesk 3D REVIT file and 2D standard details and specifications are available for download.

Please contact ASST at 717.630.1251 x305 for architectural support or x307 for specific project estimating assistance.